Hope there’s someone

Antony and the Johnsons

Hope there’s someone
Who’ll take care of me
When I die, will I go

Hope there’s someone
Who’ll set my heart free
Nice to hold when I’m tired

There’s a ghost on the horizon
When I go to bed
How can I fall asleep at night
How will I rest my head

Oh I’m scared of the middle place
Between light and nowhere
I don’t want to be the one
Left in there, left in there

There’s a man on the horizon
Wish that I’d go to bed
If I fall to his feet tonight
Will allow rest my head

So here’s hoping I will not drown
Or paralyze in light
And godsend I don’t want to go
To the seal’s watershed

Hope there’s someone
Who’ll take care of me
When I die, Will I go

Hope there’s someone
Who’ll set my heart free
Nice to hold when I’m tired

 

 

 

行者 The Walker

The final scene showing Yang Gui-mei walking in the park and sobbing for an inordinate amount of time in Tsai Ming-liang’s Vive L’Amour (1994) remains one of the most memorable moments in cinema for me.

Some twenty years later, I’ve had the chance to watch a three-part play ‘Only You’ by the same director at the Esplanade Theatre Studio, showcasing the same actors. Over the years, I’ve learnt to appreciate the silence of his films, a welcome space and time for me to escape the noise of everyday life.

It was also the first time I’ve heard the director speak about his work. One wisdom stuck though. That perhaps we don’t always need to search for the answer. Our fixation on getting answers oftentimes hinders our ability to appreciate life, to feel the beauty of the moment. I think what he said here all about sums up his existentialist perspective.

今天不懂,明天会懂。
如果明天不懂,明年会懂。
要如明年不懂,十年后会懂。

And it all begins with the act of walking…

 

 

Vive L’Amour (Final Scene)

 

The Walker (Commissioned by HK International Film Festival 2012)

Watch the full 20-minute video here.

 

 

Sheer coincidence?

* * * * *

HPB to reward senior citizens who brisk walk regularly
by Tan Weizhen
04:45 AM Apr 30, 2012
SINGAPORE – The Health Promotion Board (HPB) yesterday released the findings of a study involving 1,200 seniors, which showed that those who participated in the National Brisk Walking Programme were, on average, 8 per cent fitter than their peers.

Source: TODAYonline

Economic interest or life?

Transcript begins…

MANFRED MAX-NEEF: Growth is a quantitative accumulation. Development is the liberation of creative possibilities. Every living system in nature grows up to a certain point and stops growing. You are not growing anymore, nor he nor me. But we continue developing ourselves. Otherwise we wouldn’t be dialoguing here now. So development has no limits. Growth has limits. And that is a very big thing, you know, that economists and politicians don’t understand. They are obsessed with the fetish of economic growth.

And I am working, several decades. Many studies have been done. I’m the author of a famous hypothesis, the threshold hypothesis, which says that in every society there is a period in which economic growth, conventionally understood or no, brings about an improvement of the quality of life. But only up to a point, the threshold point, beyond which, if there is more growth, quality of life begins to decline. And that is the situation in which we are now.

I mean, your country is the most dramatic example that you can find. I have gone as far as saying — and this is a chapter of a book of mine that is published next month in England, the title of which is Economics Unmasked. There is a chapter called “The United States, an Underdeveloping Nation,” which is a new category. We have developed, underdeveloped and developing. Now you have underdeveloping. And your country is an example, in which the one percent of the Americans, you know, are doing better and better and better, and the 99 percent is going down, in all sorts of manifestations. People living in their cars now and sleeping in their cars, you know, parked in front of the house that used to be their house — thousands of people. Millions of people, you know, have lost everything. But the speculators that brought about the whole mess, oh, they are fantastically well off. No problem. No problem.

Watch the interview here.

Source: Democracy Now! A Daily Independent Global News Hour with Amy Goodman & Juan González

Austin :: Blake Shelton

 

 

She left without leavin’ a number
Said she needed to clear her mind
He figured she’d gone back to Austin
‘Cause she talked about it all the time
It was almost a year before she called him up
Three rings and an answering machine is what she got

If you’re callin’ ’bout the car I sold it
If this is Tuesday night I’m bowling
If you’ve got somethin’ to sell, you’re wastin’ your time, I’m not
buyin’
If it’s anybody else, wait for the tone,
You know what to do
And P.S. if this is Austin, I still love you

The telephone fell to the counter
She heard but she couldn’t believe
What kind of man would hang on that long
What kind of love that must be
She waited three days, and then she tried again
She didn’t know what she’d say,
But she heard three rings and then

If it’s Friday night I’m at the ballgame
And first thing Saturday, if it don’t rain
I’m headed out to the lake
And I’ll be gone, all weekend long
But I’ll call you back when I get home
On Sunday afternoon
And P.S. If this is Austin, I still love you

Well, this time she left her number
But not another word
Then she waited by the phone on Sunday evenin’
And this is what he heard

If you’re callin’ ’bout my heart
It’s still yours
I should’ve listened to it a little more
Then it wouldn’t have taken me so long to know where I belong
And by the way, boy, this is no machine you’re talkin’ to
Can’t you tell, this is Austin, and I still love you

I still love you